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Old 21st November 2008
Ben Noble Ben Noble is offline
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Default Lanyard Length

Hi all,

We all know that a lanyard can be a maximum of 100cm long, but what does this specifically mean? Version 11.2 rules (section 2.2.2) state that:

It is made up of;
• a semi-elastic or non elastic link between 30cm (minimum) and 100cm (maximum when stretched) in length, made up of a material designed to not make knots (e.g. a cord, or a cord covered with plastic).

To me, this translates to "the cord must be a maximum 100cm" and it does not specify whether the whole lanyard (ie. from the wrist/leg connection point to the end of the Carabiner) must be a maximum of 100cm.

I have noticed on some lanyards that the total length from Carabiner to wrist connection point is 100cm, and this is the case with the one I purchased a few years ago and still use today (the cord is 80cm, total length 99cm).

Am I right in assuming that, as long as the cord is a maximum of 100cm fully stretched, the whole lanyard (top of Carabiner to the wrist connecting point) can be longer than 100cm? I want to make another lanyard but wish to have the longest one that's still legal.

Actually - if anyone knows of any changes to lanyard construction rules in the upcoming 2009 AIDA rules then it might be a good idea to give us some advance notice so we can start making changes now and be ready for 2009.

Cheers,
Ben
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Old 21st November 2008
osusim osusim is offline
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Ben, I guess it length from a carabineer till O/D-ring of wrist band.

New requirements (not official yet):
Quote:
Safety Lanyard
4.1.3.1
A safety lanyard is mandatory for all depth events.
4.1.3.2
The safety lanyard binds the athlete to the warm-up line or to the official line. It is made up of:
A carabineer without screws in which the opening (minimum 15mm) is big enough to allow the carabineer to be placed and hooked to the line without difficulty. The "finger" of the carabineer must function normally; in other words opening with little pressure and closing automatically.
A non elastic link between 30cm (minimum) and 150cm (maximum when stretched) in length, made up of a material designed to not make knots (e.g. a cord, or a cord covered with plastic).
A wrist or ankle band which cannot be removed inadvertently, which includes a ring having an interior diameter of a minimum of 26mm for athletes wearing the lanyard on the wrist; OR a belt other than the weight belt, which cannot be removed inadvertently for those wearing the lanyard on the waist, the belt holding the lanyard must be situated higher than the weight belt. In this last case, the freediver will still wear a wrist band, which cannot be removed inadvertently, including a lanyard ring of an interior diameter of a minimum of 26mm. Every athlete must have a ring on their wrist.
The total weight of the safety lanyard may not exceed 500gr.
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Old 22nd November 2008
Ben Noble Ben Noble is offline
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Thanks for your response Igor, that is not exactly how I would interpret it but highlights how easy it is to interpret something differently.

I interpret the definition as only including the cord, not the quick release, D-ring and carabiner. I would hate to turn up to a comp and have a judge interpret the rule incorrectly.

It might seem a bit trivial, but when you think a Carabiner is about 10cm long, a quick release and D-clip combined is about 10cm long then you're talking about a 20% variation in length already. It would be good to get the Technical Commission's opinion on this.

Thanks for reminding me of the upcoming new rules too, it would be good to know if the lanyards are going to change length beforehand.

Cheers,
Ben
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Old 5th December 2008
Sam Kirby Sam Kirby is offline
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Hi Ben

i always measure it "wrist to rope" at full stretch - that's a fairly straightforward way of getting it right however the lanyard is made.

Sam
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